PCmag

Facebook stops fighting California Privacy Act

When your CEO just faced a grilling by the Senate over a lack of privacy and data protection, it looks pretty bad if a company continues to fight against new privacy laws. So it will come as little surprise that Facebook has decided to no longer fight to block the proposed California Consumer Privacy Act. The Privacy Act being proposed would empower anyone in the state to tell businesses not to share or sell their personal data, give them the right to know what personal information is collected about them, and offers protections for consumers “who are victims of negligent business practices resulting in security breaches of data.” All of which don’t help a company like Facebook, which profits from having a lot of freedom to collect and use your data. As Engadget reports, ...

Intel teases chip redesign to stop Meltdown, Spectre flaws

File photo: SANTA CLARA, CA – JANUARY 16: The Intel logo is displayed outside of the Intel headquarters on January 16, 2014 in Santa Clara, California. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)  (2014 Getty Images) Intel’s long-term fix for the Meltdown and Spectre flaws will involve a chip redesign that introduces “protective walls” around a PC’s sensitive data. “We have redesigned parts of the processor to introduce new levels of protection through partitioning,” Intel’s CEO Brian Krzanich said in a Thursday blog post. “Think of this partitioning as additional ‘protective walls’ between applications and user privilege levels to create an obstacle for bad actors.” In January, Krzanich discussed “silicon-based chan...

Can net neutrality survive 5G?

BARCELONA—A one-size-fits-all approach to net neutrality won’t work in a 5G world, Ericsson CEO Börje Ekholm said at an MWC press conference. “Not all traffic is created equal,” he said. “In the 5G future, mission-critical apps such as remote surgery will have to take priority over other traffic. There will need to be a regulatory regime that allows the service provider to create services that are differentiated based on user experiences.” Here’s Ekholm’s problem: he’s Swedish. So he’s probably thinking about reasonable governments that operate based on some sort of societal consensus, not the completely broken politics we have in the US. Our political net neutrality debate currently see-saws between the extremes of “ISPs should b...