Hiring

The Muse, a popular recruitment site for millennial women, has made its second acquisition

The Muse, a New York-based, content-rich recruitment site that matches job seekers and all kinds of information about different career paths, as well as with companies that are hiring, has made it second acquisition, picking up TalentShare, a year-old, HR software-as-a service company. TalentShare has been focused on enabling companies to share high-quality candidates that they didn’t hire but would recommend to other companies that are in the market for talent. Terms aren’t being disclosed, but four of TalentShare’s five-member team are joining The Muse. In fact, those new employees will help The Muse in establishing a second office in San Francisco. We talked earlier this week with The Muse’s co-founder and CEO Kathryn Minshew about TalentShare, whose tie-up with the company comes roughl...

Mike Curtis, Airbnb’s VP of engineering, is leaving

Airbnb’s head of engineering will leave the company before the end of 2018 to pursue other projects and focus on his family. The news was first reported by The Information and later confirmed to TechCrunch by Airbnb. Curtis joined the home-sharing platform in 2013 after about two years as the director of engineering at Facebook. Airbnb will work with Heidrick & Struggles to find his successor, who will be named chief technology officer, a title some at the company had expected Curtis to receive last year, per The Information. Airbnb has several other holes in its C-suite; it’s also in the process of hiring a chief marketing officer and a chief financial officer. “For a while, Mike has been thinking about making this change to take a long break,” an Airbnb spokesperson told TechCrunch. ...

Tokens can better incentivize startup employees than equity

Token structuring and tokeneconomics are among of the most important considerations when designing a blockchain. When thinking about how best to distribute these tokens, founders often think about how the tokens will impact external stakeholders such as their investors, the community, and stakers (people that can mine or validate block transactions according to how many coins he or she holds). But token economies are also bringing disruption to organizations internally, especially when it comes to HR and compensation. If the tokens are structured properly for a blockchain, external stakeholders will be directly aligned with the goal of the project. Those incentives can encourage participation on the blockchain platform and/or drive token demand with community-building and marketing. Simila...

How Silicon Valley should celebrate Labor Day

Ask any 25-year old engineer what Labor Day means to him or her, and you might get an answer like: it’s the surprise three-day weekend after a summer of vacationing. Or it’s the day everyone barbecues at Dolores Park. Or it’s the annual Tahoe trip where everyone gets to relive college. Or simply, it’s the day we get off because we all work so hard. And while founders and employees in startup land certainly work hard, wearing their 80-hour workweeks as a badge of honor, closing deals on conference calls in an air-conditioned WeWork is a far cry from the backbreaking working conditions of the 1880s, the era when Labor Day was born. For everyone here in Silicon Valley, we should not be celebrating this holiday triumphantly over beers and hot dogs, complacent in the belief that our gravest lab...

Distributed teams are rewriting the rules of office(less) politics

When we think about designing our dream home, we don’t think of having a thousand roommates in the same room with no doors or walls. Yet in today’s workplace where we spend most of our day, the purveyors of corporate office design insist that tearing down walls and bringing more people closer together in the same physical space will help foster better collaboration while dissolving the friction of traditional hierarchy and office politics. But what happens when there is no office at all? This is the reality for Jason Fried, Founder and CEO of Basecamp, and Matt Mullenweg, Founder and CEO of Automattic (makers of WordPress), who both run teams that are 100% distributed across six continents and many time zones. Fried and Mullenweg are the founding fathers of a movement that has inspired at ...

Triplebyte has raised more money for its “background blind” tech recruiting platform

Triplebyte is a three-year-old, 25-person, San Francisco-based hiring platform that says it makes recruiting and technical screening for tech companies more efficient. It’s hardly alone in making this claim, of course. You can’t swing a dead cat without hitting a tech recruiting platform that claims to improve on the ways that companies identify and recruit talented engineers. Still, Triplebyte makes a persuasive case for why hiring companies should give it a shot. One of its biggest differentiators, it says, is that its process is “background blind,” meaning it’s ostensibly able to get engineers in front of companies that might not otherwise be interested in them based on their past employers or education. How? By operating like an applied research company, insists cofounder and CEO Harj ...

HR has lost the trust of employees. Here is who has it now

Human resources has to be one of the greatest bait-and-switch professions one can join today. HR departments position themselves with a forward-facing fluffy image, whether improving the productivity of workers through training and development programs or perhaps righting the yawning inequality gap in America by encouraging diverse hiring standards. Unsurprisingly, the field often attracts starry-eyed idealists, people who seek a mission-oriented, perhaps even noble profession for their careers. They join thinking they are going to make a difference. Then the corruption happens. A superior has made a pass at a subordinate, and an executive of the company asks that the subordinate be fired to “clean up” the situation. An employee repeatedly makes homophobic, racist, or sexist remarks to the...

Scaling a bootstrapped business is next frontier of entrepreneurship for Evan Frank

Evan Frank was five years old when he first knew he was going to be an entrepreneur. While attending kindergarten, Frank crafted books and sold them to his teacher at a nickel to a dime a piece. “There was always this desire to build stuff,” he explained to me, and also clearly a desire to make some money on those projects, to boot. Frank, who lives in New York City, was a co-founder and eventual CEO of onefinestay, which sold in early 2016 to AccorHotels for $170 million. Now, he is embarking on the latest of his entrepreneurial endeavors, as the new CEO of Context Travel, a company that specializes in deeply researched tours in cities around the world. Until recently, the 14-year-old company was bootstrapped by its founders Paul Bennett and Lani Bevacqua, before raising $5 million in pri...

Hate your boss? B12 is designing work without (human) managers

Online labor marketplaces have been around since the dawn of the internet. Post a task, select a worker, verify the work, and submit a payment. There are dozens of companies that broker labor services, and the rise of these marketplaces has been a large factor in encouraging as many as a third of American workers to become freelancers. While finding individual workers for simple tasks is now common online, finding and building teams to solve complex tasks is anything but. Diverse skill sets, complex relationships between tasks, and the need for institutional memory around a project have made team building on the internet a challenging subject for researchers and startup founders alike. Using research around a concept called flash teams, New York-based B12 is looking to solve the team-based...

Stressing aptitude over achievement, Strive Talent pitches a new way to hire

While unemployment in the U.S. hit a 17-year low and the stock market keeps humming along, there’s a lingering sense that all is still not well in U.S. labor markets. Most jobs require a college degree these days, a proposition that’s becoming increasingly unaffordable even if it is attainable. Many students who graduate are saddled with so much debt that not even a decent salaried job can guarantee payback in a reasonable amount of time. And the effects of this debt overhang ripple through the entire economy. Against this backdrop a number of startups are rethinking how hiring should work, because while many employers require a college degree for a job, the fact is that most of the skills needed to perform those jobs aren’t taught in college. Enter Strive Talent, a new startup that’s tryi...

Coinbase hires a new VP of Operations to lead its customer service effort

Coinbase just announced they’re hiring Tina Bhatnagar as VP of Operations and Technology to lead all operational teams at Coinbase and GDAX. But perhaps most relevant right now is the fact that her responsibilities will include overseeing the fast growing startup’s customer service division. It’s no secret that Coinbase is in need of some help with it comes to support and customer service. The company has struggled to handle both technical and customer support operations during the massive spikes in price, new users, and transactions over the last few months. Tina Bhatnagar But Coinbase isn’t blind to these shortfalls, and about six months ago unveiled a plan to revamp their customer service experience and roll out phone support and shorter response times. They also recently hired Asiff Hi...

Snap Inc. lays off at least two dozen amid slowed user growth and engagement

Snap Inc. has laid off at least two dozen people across several divisions within the company, according to the Information, which first reported the news. Snap has since confirmed these layoffs, which largely affect those on the content teams in the New York and London offices. Over half of the two dozen employees laid off today were part of the content team. Snap tells TechCrunch that what’s left of the content division will now move to the company’s Venice, California location and that it will continue to hire on the content team. According  to Snap, this is just part of finding the right people for the job. These layoffs may also not have been unexpected as they are part of a reorganization effort to cut costs due to the lackluster growth at the six-year old company. Investors have been...

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