/FOX NEWS/OPINION

Lara Trump: The Donald Trump I know

Lara Trump is seen here with her husband Eric Trump, son Luke, and her father-in-law, President Donald Trump.  (Courtesy of the author) President Trump – my father-in-law – changed the life of one woman and her family last week when he commuted the life prison sentence of Alice Marie Johnson, a black single mother who served more than 20 years of a horribly unjust punishment for a non-violent drug conviction. “This is the greatest day of my life, my heart is just bursting with gratitude for what has … happened to me today,” exclaimed Alice Johnson upon her release from prison. “I want to thank President Donald John Trump – Hallelujah! – for giving me another chance at life and restoring me to my family.” I’m not surprised at this reaction. The Donald Trump I know is the Donald Trump ...

Tammy Bruce: California’s new water rationing law is a tax in disguise, complete with fines

 (iStock) Last week’s column about California’s new water rationing apparently upset some of the Golden State’s swamp. This columnist pointed out that a new law signed by Gov. Jerry Brown set new “standards” of water usage. Here’s what their water-rationing bill (now law) says, in language everyone can understand: “The bill, until January 1, 2025, would establish 55 gallons per capita daily as the standard for indoor residential water use. … The bill would impose civil liability for a violation of an order or regulation issued pursuant to these provisions, as specified.” Yet, when confronted with a public discussion about what this means, the swamp pulled together to “debunk” the argument that the water rationing with fines was, well, water rationing with fines. The spin machine went into ...

Attacking Trump is now a losing strategy in BOTH parties — That’s the real takeaway from Tuesday’s primaries

Tuesday’s primaries in Virginia, North Dakota, Nevada, South Carolina, and Maine indicated that in many congressional races, vehemently attacking President Trump will not be a winning strategy for either Democrats or Republicans in the Nov. 6 general election. As we’ve seen in earlier primaries this year, it was clear Tuesday that while strongly resisting President Trump is certainly damaging to Democrats, doing so is nothing short of catastrophic for Republicans. GOP voters in several races showed once again that they are rejecting lawmakers who decisively break with the president. Instead of building their campaigns on being anti-Trump, candidates in both parties would be wise to develop compelling moderate policy alternatives and a unifying message that can appeal to centrist and indepe...

Liz Peek: Negative Nancy Pelosi bummed out by booming Trump economy

Is Nancy Pelosi a secret agent for the Republican Party? Sometimes you have to wonder.  Her latest outburst, in which she derides the accelerating economy and declining unemployment, is so nonsensical that it demeans Democrats’ credibility, shows them to be remarkably out of touch with average Americans and underscores the poverty of their competing platform. It isn’t the first time Pelosi has given GOP candidates rich fodder for ridicule; remember how she compared thousand-dollar bonuses to “crumbs?” That’s a clip that will show well in midterm campaign ads. Pelosi’s latest Twitter sensation came amidst her weekly press conference, at which she scorned the improving jobs situation. Here’s a direct quote: “(P)eople say, ‘Oh my goodness, … people are saying the unemployment rate...

David Bossie: Much-anticipated Inspector General’s report on DOJ, FBI comes out this week — then what?

DOJ inspector general report expected to be released June 14 New details about upcoming IG report released as top congressional lawmakers may get access to FBI confidential source records relating to the use of an informant in the Trump presidential campaign; chief intelligence correspondent Catherine Herridge reports. Department of Justice Inspector General (“IG”) Michael Horowitz’s report will finally be made public on Thursday of this week.  After an investigation that’s lasted well over a year, I’m cautiously optimistic that the report will answer many questions about the Federal Bureau of Investigation under former Director James Comey and Acting-Director Andrew McCabe and the Justice Department under former Attorney General Loretta Lynch.  This report may also help restore some of th...

Harry Kazianis: Trump’s North Korea summit can succeed if he remembers this one thing

When I recently asked a North Korean defector, who I have known for years, how he would describe dictator Kim Jong Un to President Trump as he prepares for his summit—or showdown—in Singapore, an instantaneous, one-word answer was all that was needed. “Hitler.” I paused, partly out of shock, but partly out of anger, as my own family was forced to leave Greece after World War II, all thanks to the countless horrors inflicted by Nazi Germany. I wanted to ask my friend why he offered such a brief but unsettling answer—attempting to point out what that meant, the severity of such a statement and how it seemed sometimes almost overused, to the point of being nearly worthless. But I never got the chance. Knowing him all too well, I could tell he was growing impatient. He cut me off, something he...

Seattle cracks down on renters, free speech – and common sense. Good luck trying to rent an apartment

FILE — The Space Needle is seen on the skyline of tech hub Seattle, Washington.  (REUTERS/Chris Helgren) The Seattle City Council seems to think the right to speak is a privilege it can grant or withhold at its pleasure. It has slapped a year-long ban on the use of certain housing websites that allow renters to place bids on advertised rental housing, while it reviews the sites. Officials say they fear the sites might violate local housing laws or inflate housing costs, so the City Council wants to study the sites while forbidding their use in the meantime. While city leaders try to figure things out, landlords are barred from posting ads on the sites, and renters can’t even do a simple search for Seattle housing on the sites. This is a clear restriction of speech protected by the Fi...

Trump prepares for North Korea summit as a great performer — like Reagan

With the Tuesday summit in Singapore between President Trump and North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un just around the corner, a flurry of planning, negotiating, strategizing and perhaps even a bit of finger-crossing is underway. The stakes are enormously high, and yet the risks – and opportunities – are even higher. President Trump is likely eager to put his “Art of the Deal” skills to the test on the global stage. While there are plenty of differences between President Trump and President Reagan, both came to the White House with a background in entertainment, which serves as a surprising advantage. Critics mocked President Reagan for his past career in the movies and on TV. Many asked: How can an actor be president? In typical Ronald Reagan fashion, with an impish smile, the man known as th...

Newt Gingrich: The red wave is growing

Over the past few days, four building blocks have fallen into place that strengthen the case for a red wave of Republican victories in the November midterm elections, wiping out Democratic hopes for a blue wave. Three of these building blocks are Republican-favoring political developments in what would normally be considered safe, blue states. First, New Jersey’s U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez is a Democrat who has been deeply weakened by charges of corruption. He was tried in a long, highly-publicized trial that ended in mistrial. The government decided not to prosecute again, but the news reports about the case had already shed light on some of Menendez’s actions, which were pretty indefensible. Then the Senate Ethics Committee admonished Menendez in April for serious corruption allegations. The...

California breaks Democrats’ hearts: ‘Big, blue shutout’ fails and other takeaways from Tuesday’s primaries

Eight-state primary wrap up On a busy night of elections, voting took place in Alabama, Mississippi, New Mexico, New Jersey, South Dakota, Iowa and Montana. Here’s a look at some of the biggest takeaways. Neither party managed to land any knockout blows in California Tuesday as voters went to the polls there and in seven other states to pick candidates who will face off in the Nov. 6 midterm elections, when control of the U.S. House and Senate will be up for grabs. The fate of President Trump’s legislative priorities will hang in the balance in November. Right now Republicans control both the House and Senate, but a swing of just 23 seats would give Democrats a House majority. The GOP holds a narrow majority of 51 seats in the Senate, with Democrats controlling 47 seats and independe...

Newt Gingrich: The Republican comeback is a real threat to the elite media’s ‘blue wave’ theory

Every time members of the elite media mention the “blue wave” that is supposedly coming in the Nov. 6 congressional elections, they seem more and more delusional. In fact, as the elections draw closer, Republican victories are looking much more likely. In December, it seemed plausible that Democrats would make gains – the opposition party often grows in the first midterm elections of a new presidency. The polls at the end of 2017 also supported the idea. It made sense that the elite media would pick up the “blue wave” theory as a continuation of the reflexive anti-Trump narrative they had touted throughout Trump’s candidacy and first year in office. However, the “blue wave” storyline was created before many of the benefits of the Trump-Republican agenda began to take hold, and it’s going t...

Doug Schoen: The Democrats are at war — with each other. And it could spell disaster in November

Eight states – Alabama, California, Iowa, Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico and South Dakota – will hold primaries Tuesday to pick candidates to run in the midterm general elections Nov. 6. But before turning our attention to those races, it’s useful to look back at primary results in May and see how they reveal a Democratic party in a deep state of division. Voters in Democratic primaries are split between staunchly progressive and more moderate factions. In the struggle for leadership of the party, supporters of each faction are potentially fatally weakening the Democrats for November contests, and potentially for the 2020 elections as well. That could pave the way for President Trump to be re-elected. There has been a dramatic change in the generic polling for Congress. Repub...