computer security

Social SafeGuard scores $11M to sell alerts for brand-damaging fakes

Social SafeGuard, a 2014-founded U.S. startup which sells security services to enterprises aimed at mitigating a range of digital risks that lie outside the corporate firewall, has closed an $11 million Series B funding round, from AllegisCyber and NightDragon Security. It’s hoping to ride the surge in awareness around social media fakery — putting the new funding towards sales and marketing, plus some product dev. “As one of the few dedicated cybersecurity venture firms, we know how big this challenge has become for today’s security executives,” said Spencer Tall, MD of AllegisCyber, in a supporting statement. Tall is joining the Social SafeGuard board. “This is no longer a fringe need that can be ignored or deferred. Digital risk protection should be on the shortlist of corporate securit...

A simple solution to end the encryption debate

David Gurle Contributor Bill Harrington Contributor Criminals and terrorists, like millions of others, rely on smartphone encryption to protect the information on their mobile devices. But unlike most of us, the data on their phones could endanger lives and pose a great threat to national security. The challenge for law enforcement, and for us as a society, is how to reconcile the advantages of gaining access to the plans of dangerous individuals with the cost of opening a door to the lives of everyone else. It is the modern manifestation of the age-old conflict between privacy versus security, playing out in our pockets and palms. One-size-fits all technological solutions, like a manufacturer-built universal backdoor tool for smartphones, likely create more dangers than they prevent. Whil...

We love augmented reality, but let’s fix things that could become big problems

Cyan Banister Contributor Cyan Banister is a partner at Founders Fund, where she invests across sectors and stages with a particular interest in augmented reality, fertility, heavily regulated industries and businesses that help people with basic skills find meaningful work. More posts by this contributor Penn Jillette Turns To FundAnything To Become A Bad Guy Despite Flaws, Ashton As Jobs Is Worth Seeing Alex Hertel Contributor Alex Hertel is the co-founder of Xperiel. Augmented Reality (AR) is still in its infancy and has a very promising youth and adulthood ahead. It has already become one of the most exciting, dynamic, and pervasive technologies ever developed. Every day someone is creating a novel way to reshape the real world with a new digital innovation. Over the past couple of dec...

Facebook, Microsoft and others sign anti-cyberattack pledge

Microsoft, Facebook and Cloudflare are among a group of technology firms that have signed a joint pledge committing publicly not to assist offensive government cyberattacks. The pledge also commits them to work together to enhance security awareness and the resilience of the global tech ecosystem. The four top-line principles the firms are agreeing to are [ALL CAPS theirs]: 1. WE WILL PROTECT ALL OF OUR USERS AND CUSTOMERS EVERYWHERE. 2. WE WILL OPPOSE CYBERATTACKS ON INNOCENT CITIZENS AND ENTERPRISES FROM ANYWHERE. 3. WE WILL HELP EMPOWER USERS, CUSTOMERS AND DEVELOPERS TO STRENGTHEN CYBERSECURITY PROTECTION. 4. WE WILL PARTNER WITH EACH OTHER AND WITH LIKEMINDED GROUPS TO ENHANCE CYBERSECURITY. You can read the full Cybersecurity Tech Accord here. So far 34 companies have signed up to th...

The United States needs a Department of Cybersecurity

Ted Schlein Contributor Ted Schlein, a general partner at venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, focuses on early-stage technology companies in the enterprise software and infrastructure markets, including ventures within the networking and consumer security arenas. More posts by this contributor What Silicon Valley can do about cyber threats The Entrepreneur’s Guide To Surviving A Tech Bubble  This week over 40,000 security professionals will attend RSA in San Francisco to see the latest cyber technologies on display and discuss key issues. No topic will be higher on the agenda than the Russian sponsored hack of the American 2016 election with debate about why the country has done so little to respond and what measures should be taken to deter future attempts at subver...

Lessons from cybersecurity exits

Dear F0und3r: What a month this has been for cybersecurity! One unicorn IPO and two nice acquisitions – Zscaler’s great debut on wall street,  a $300 million acquisition of Evident.io by Palo Alto Networks and a $350 million acquisition of Phantom Cyber by Splunk has gotten all of us excited. Word on the street is that in each of those exits, the founders took home ~30% to 40% of the proceeds. Which is not bad for ~ 4 /5 years of work. They can finally afford to buy two bedroom homes in Silicon Valley. Evident.IO Investment Rounds and Return estimates Date Select Investors Round Size Pre Post Dilution Estimated Returns / Multiple of Invested Capital Sep 2013 True Ventures $1.5m $5.25m $6.75 m 22% 44X Nov 2014 Bain Capital $9.8 m $18.1m $28.0 m 35% 10.7X Apr 2016 Venrock $15.7 m $35.0 m $50...

The state of Israel’s cybersecurity market

Ofer Schreiber is a partner at YL Ventures. More posts by this contributor: Iren Reznikov Contributor Iren Reznikov is an analyst for YL Ventures. More posts by this contributor: The Equifax breach, WannaCry, NotPetya, the NSA leak, and many more cyber incidents – 2017 was certainly a busy year for hackers, illustrating yet again just how vital innovative cybersecurity solutions are in the fight against cyber threats. Second only to the U.S., in terms of cybersecurity investment 2017 was another excellent year for Israeli cybersecurity startups, with dozens of companies being formed, breaking fundraising records and producing solid exits. The 2017 data also suggest that the Israeli cybersecurity industry is maturing, as we see a shift in funding towards later stage companies. More Capital,...

Security researchers flag invite bug in WhatsApp group chats

Security researchers have revealed details of a vulnerability in WhatsApp’s security that could be used to compromise the secrecy of encrypted group chats on the messaging platform. The risk associated with the flaw is limited on account of attackers needing to have access to WhatsApp servers to be able to insert themselves into a group conversation. That said, WhatsApp does continue to face pressure from governments over its use of end-to-end encryption. So any vulnerability that could even theoretically offer a route for the company to be coerced by state entities to collaborate with their agents to afford a degree of access to encrypted conversations is worth highlighting. Wired reports that the encryption flaws, which were detailed today at the Real World Crypto security conference in ...